Havana…… ooh nanana ūüéľūüé§ūüéĻ

As promised here is the start of the Havana pics…..

a couple of interesting street shots to start off….

One side of the Hotel Nacional de Cuba…originally designed as a casino in the 40‚Äôs the hotel was nationalized after 1959…..

 

 

A little history about Havana ……

Founded in 1519 (this year is the 500th anniversary of Havana) as a city of the pirate age, and the even more frequent naval attacks by other countries, the area known as Old Havana was at one point a walled city.  The city and bay were stopover points for the treasure laden Spanish galleons returning to Spain from South and Central America.  In 1555 the pirate Jacques de Sores burned Havana while sacking the city in search of treasure.  He destroyed the existing fort in the process but he didn’t find much. After that incident, the Spanish sent soldiers, built a wall and a new fortress (the Castillo de la Real Fuerza) which still stands and is now a museum.

Castillo Real de la Fuerza

 

Let me just move this cannon out of the way ….ouch…those cannon shells are pointy


As the pirate and a military naval warfare age faded the wall became obsolete  and was slowly removed as the city expanded.

 

This is one of the remaining corners….

 

Mike reaches back in time …..and breaks a rule by touching the wall….


 

A different type of warfare in 1961…..remnants of the weapons supplied by the USSR ….the small SAU-100 tank which was used by Castro to fire shells at a US Naval vessel during the Bay of Pigs invasion.

 

And now….Hemingway‚Äôs former haunts in Havana ……Sloppy Joe‚Äôs and the Floridita (home of the original daiquiri)…….

Sloppy Joe’s was originally opened by Jose Garcia as the Rio Havana in the 1930’s and was allegedly nicknamed Sloppy Joe’s because of the constantly wet floors from the melting ice in the seafood cases.  The house sandwich also adopted the name and was made of Ropa Vieja, a slow cooked wet beef.

Garcia came to Cuba from Spain in 1904, moved to New Orleans, and returned to Havana in 1919. Garcia was a career barman.  As a barman it was obviously difficult to make a living in the US during prohibition.  The building was a grocery store and warehouse before Garcia opened his bar. Hemingway recommended the name Sloppy Joe’s for a bar owned by his friend Joe Russell of Key West in honor of Garcia. Russell, a bootlegger and speakeasy operator, ran the Key West bar under a few names before he took Hemingway’s suggestion.   Hemingway had an apartment on one of the upper floors of the Rio Havana prior to 1959 when the bar was closed by the government until 2008.

Hemingway‚Äôs favorite spot for a daiquiri…..

 

An interesting angle of the original Bacardi building…..the Bacardi family left Cuba in 1959 and relocated to Puerto Rico.

I once read an article in Sail magazine by someone who took a sailboat to  Cuba, but elected to stay in a rented apartment in Havana for the duration of their visit???? The author whined throughout the article about the air quality in Havana due to the poorly maintained old cars throughout the city. Nothing could be further from the truth.


What to Expect When You’re Expecting to Arrive in Cuba…Part 3 of the Cuba Series

 

So, there’s been a few changes to the U.S. administrative aspects for visiting Cuba. That doesn’t mean the visits are completely over. People from the US have been visiting Cuba for decades before some restrictions were eased in 2010. The important thing to remember is that nothing lasts forever. You could, and still can in some instances, visit Cuba without supporting the Cuban government. There has been a blanket policy instituted prohibiting private vessels and aircraft from visiting but this has yet to be tested. It seems a bit discriminatory, to me, to allow guided tours by companies and yet prevent private citizens from visiting for the same licensed purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

Based on my conversations with the citizenry, the Cuban people are weary of their government running every aspect of their lives but live in fear of being jailed for speaking their minds.  Visits to Cuba and the expenditure of foreign dollars at places controlled by the government (i.e. Cruise ship areas and many of the tourist traps in downtown Havana) only perpetuate the system that oppresses its own people and supports similar systems elsewhere.  Cruise ship fees go directly to the government and military.  Almost all the shops and attractions around the cruise ship ports are government controlled.  We were very cautious to only visit private businesses, which are only the very small family run style and the individual owners keeps the proceeds. Marina Hemingway is controlled by a private group and is the only marina where you can currently clear in when coming from the US.

Cuba is the only country I have ever visited, where, despite the constant touting of their healthcare system by some, you continually meet adults with completely treatable conditions which they are not “permitted” to have surgery or other remedies to correct. ¬†The most notable was an otherwise perfectly health young bartender who had suffered from frequent infections of his tonsils since he was a small child. ¬†He was frequently unable to speak for a week or more. ¬†The only treatment he could obtain was a constant supply of antibiotics which will eventually lead to bacterial resistance and a host of other side effects. He was also not allowed to leave the country for surgery.

I’ve read a lot of complaints about the tightening of the visitation regulations. ¬†Most seem rather selfish and short sighted. Imagine if the employees at any business were denigrated, oppressed, threatened, denied healthcare, and generally mistreated by the management ? Would you still patronize them and line the pockets of their oppressors? If Europeans and Canadians were allowed to go, and went, at times supporting such a system, would you use that as an excuse to visit through that form of tourism anyway ?

US Travelers can still visit Cuba, subject to specific conditions:

Family visits
Official U.S. government business
Journalistic activity–you must be employed full time by a recognized media outlet….unfortunately bloggers don’t qualify
Professional research and meetings
Educational activities (like those from U.S. academic institutions and secondary schools)
Religious activities
Support for the Cuban people—this will hopefully be the license that allows private vessels to visit again.
Humanitarian projects

If this program doesn’t work out we will have to wait till the tide turns and we can more easily visit Cuba again (without supporting this current Cuban government) let’s still be ready……

You’ve done all your research, you have the USCG permit email in your hot little hands, the boat is ready to go and there is a weather window approaching right on cue. ¬†Why are you so nervous then?

Over the decades there has been a lot of misinformation floating around about Cuba, some even correct information attributed to the incorrect source or cause.  Some people believe it is crime ridden, dirty and unsafe. I have always judged places I visit by the character of the people and not the spit and polish state of their buildings and streets.  By this metric, Cuba could not be a better place to visit.  It certainly has infrastructure problems. Sidewalks are broken and usually poorly maintained, if still usable.  Roads are potholed, some are dirt, some (most) have horse drawn wagons on them, even the interstate.  The people are kind, honest and humble.  Cuba is more than Havana, as the US is more than NYC.  Some think Cuba must be like any American Cuban neighborhood they may have visited.  It seems that Cuban/American culture has become so commingled and diluted by American culture that it has become unique. The lack of similarities were surprising.

Back to arrival preparations…..be sure and take a stack of $5 bills for tips, I took about $100 in fives. ¬†You will meet Marina attendants and other employees who will expect small gratuities. ¬†Don’t change any money until after you are fully checked in and don’t go to the hotel or the bank when you are ready to change it.

If you like to trade things, take some MLB hats or shirts, some American beer, some bourbon or other American products that aren’t imported to Cuba. ¬†They make great gifts when someone really helps you out or just to trade and save a few bucks. ¬†We traded a case of Budweiser we bought for $15 stateside for a case of Cristal Cuban beer which was $24 a case. We gave away hats and MLB shirts to people we made friends with around the marina. That didn’t hurt when it came time to stock up on rum, coffee and cigars as we were pointed to the best sources.

As I previously mentioned, the entrance to Hemingway Marina is tricky and exposed to North winds, so you’ll have to time your arrival appropriately. ¬†The channel is a bit narrow and there was a sunken boat on the east side of the channel in about 15′ of water when we were there. ¬†If it’s your first time it will look a little confusing as you come into the inlet. ¬†The markers are on poles rather than the more traditional buoy. ¬†That makes them hard to see from a distance to be sure you are lined up. The last green mark before the turn to the customs dock (the dock, actually just a wall, is painted blue and I marked it with a blue line in the image below.) the last green mark is actually on shore and obstructed by some large growth. ¬†The seawall on your port side is the edge of the channel, but I still wouldn’t cut it too close. The channel appears to drastically narrow and in truth the last red mark does narrow it slightly but it’s not as bad as it looks. It would have greatly reduced the stress had I known the last green was on the corner of the land by the Customs dock, rather than just being confused about where it might be lurking.

 

Once you round the corner and tie up on your port side, the Customs officials, who were all much younger (early 20’s) and friendlier than we anticipated, come aboard. ¬†A Nurse comes aboard with Customs for a few minutes to take temperatures and generally check the crew for communicable diseases. ¬†The process was quick and the search was very, very minimal. ¬†The customs officers won’t accept or expect a tip, although some might accept the offer of some coffee or a soda.

Keep in mind these canals were dug out and poured in the 40’s or 50’s the concrete must have escaped from the forms during pouring and there are some large extensions that extend into the canals by 5-6′ in places at depths of 3-5′. Stay as close to the center of the canal as you can until you’re ready to tie up.

If you can, it’s a good idea when you make your reservations to request the first canal and the berths along that wall are numbered in the 100 range. ¬†We were in slip 124. ¬†The restrooms and a small snack bar are located where you make the turn into that canal, so wifi and restrooms will be convenient.

Speaking of wifi….you have to purchase wifi cards, similar to the old prepaid phone cards in the US. ¬†You can get the cards at the snack bar, the Chinese restaurant, the Yacht Club or the Mexican restaurant. ¬†Then you go to a place with wifi access, the snack bar, the Chinese restaurant, which is very good, or the Yacht Club and log in. ¬†You get an hour for $1.50CUC.

As you approach the wall in the canal, the dockmaster will probably be there to meet you. ¬† The dockmaster will hint around for a tip. I found that giving out a few $5 tips when appropriate makes later interactions much easier and the people you might need help or guidance from are obviously much more willing to help. ¬† The marina electrician has to plug your boat in and it’s a good idea to give him a small tip because you will have power outages and he will be the one fixing the power pedestal.

Next the agriculture officer will come around to inspect your food stores and make sure you don’t have any risky vegetables or meat. ¬†A Doctor from the health ministry will come aboard to verify your holding tank is closed off from discharge (they just ask but don’t inspect). ¬†After the paperwork is done both of these agents will say “we would appreciate a small tip if you’d like to give one but it isn’t necessary”, we tipped them both and they checked in on us three times during our visit to make sure we didn’t need anything.

After that you are all checked in and ready to see Cuba !!!

The store, marked as the “Ship’s Chandlery” on the satellite image is the best place¬†to change money. ¬†You can get .9 CUC for each dollar rather than .87 and paying any other penalties and if you have Cuban CUC’s left at the end, Jose the store manager, will buy them back. Jose is also a great resource for meeting other people who sell rum, cigars, coffee, souvenirs and conduct tours at much cheaper prices than the stores and other organizations. ¬†Plus you’ll know your money is going to the person and not the government.

There are two currencies in Cuba.  The CUP, the peso, is for Cubans.  The CUC is the tourist currency.  One CUC is equal to 24CUP.  Tourists are not legally allowed to have or exchange in pesos.  All businesses accept both.  Some, that charge in pesos will charge tourists in CUC one for one.  Most will adjust the exchange rate and you can eat and drink very inexpensively.  One afternoon three of us had lunch and beers for about $8.

Next time we get around Cuba and buy some goodies……

 

Where should we go ?


So…we find ourselves nearing the time when we need to decide where we will go during this next cruising season. ¬†We have a couple of choices and thought it might be fun to see what our readers thought. Keep in mind these aren’t actual navigation routes…..just general areas we would depart and arrive…..

This first route is what we did in 2016-2017…..it covers about 1,000 nautical miles (nm) and while we didn’t hit every Island we hit quite a few…..

This second, partially new, route covers what we did in 2015-2016 (Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas) plus adds Cuba, Isla Mujeres, and some hops down that coast that would end in Guatemala. Which is also a good place to be for hurricane season next year.

Courtesy of Google Maps

So….let us know what you think by voting below !!!! Feel free to leave some comments too !!!

 

Long Island…..and a long stay

On March 31st, we departed from Georgetown with our friends Bill and Judy, they were on their boat Whisper, and we covered the approximately 45 miles to Long Island. ¬†For us that’s about a ten hour day. ¬†We had heard a lot of good things about Long Island and they all turned out to be true!!

The red pin on the satellite image is Thompson Bay / Salt Pond where we were anchored for the bulk of our long stay in Long Island…..which ended up being about 16 days…..we made one aborted attempt to leave with another of our friends, Mark on Halo, but it turned out to just be too rough that day so we turned back and spent four more days waiting for the wind to die down some more……

 

 

Image courtesy of Google maps

We met a nice Canadian couple, who winter in Long Island, while we were at a local restaurant and we mentioned renting a car to see the island. ¬†The husband said he knew a minister at a local Boys Club who would let him drive us around in their van if we wouldn’t mind making a donation to the organization. ¬†Since we could fit three¬†couples plus our tour guides in the van that was much cheaper than renting a car and we got a free tour guide !!

We have discovered that renting cars in the Bahamas can be problematic. ¬†Bahamians don’t have insurance in the way that we are accustomed to thinking about it. ¬†If they have a wreck and they are at fault, their insurance company won’t pay to fix their car unless they have what they call “comprehensive” coverage (apparently different from the comprehensive we have in the states that covers window glass etc etc) ¬†but it is prohibitively expensive and none of the rental car businesses offer it. ¬†On top of that most rental companies don’t take credit cards so you have trouble making sure you’re covered here. ¬†Couple that condition with our friend’s George Town experience detailed below and you’ll understand why we went the van route.

Another of our new friends (I won’t mention his name here) rented a car in George Town. ¬†He was pulled off to the side of the road trying to get his bearings when an intoxicated local guy hit his rental car head on. ¬†When the police showed up they called the other driver by name and he quickly disappeared from the scene. ¬†Our friend, however, was whisked away to the police station where he was cited. ¬†The whole incident cost him about $300 out of pocket and cost his credit card company $5,000 for the rental car. One day while he was in town walking around he stopped by the police station to try and get a copy of the report for the his credit card company. ¬†The officer, without warning, told him he had to appear in court immediately. ¬†He was obviously not dressed for the occasion. ¬†He was nearly fined for contempt for wearing swim trunks and a t-shirt to court. ¬†Fortunately, he was able to explain he had been given no notice that he was to appear and the judge believed him. It was his intention to plead not guilty, but he was told he wouldn’t be allowed to leave the Bahamas until his trial day ….IN THREE MONTHS…which was beyond his visa expiration. ¬†Thankfully, when he rented the car, he had found a place that took credit cards and they covered the rental car damage, or it could have been much, much worse. ¬†So we decided to put a ban on renting cars in the Bahamas.

The “tour” took us to an old Spanish church with an interesting cave behind it…..the locals call it Shrimp Cave….

my apologies for the odd order of the photos ….they refused to let me rearrange them once I uploaded them this time.

A pink crab in Shrimp Cave….I wonder if he’s pink because of all the Shrimp he eats ? Like a flamingo ?

A stretch of beach on the west side just north of Thompson Bay….

Me hunting for Whelks……

 

This is the church from our tour …..

 

 

 

 

 

We also went down south a short way to a settlement called Dean’s. ¬†Now here’s an interesting oddity. ¬†In the Bahamas they say “down North” or “Up South”. ¬†It was explained to me that because of the general orientation of the sunrise and sunset it appears to rise, or come “up” in a more southerly direction and go “down” in a more Northerly direction….rather than the map orientations where North is usually up and South is usually down.

Dean’s is the home to the aptly named “Dean’s Blue Hole”….. currently the second deepest documented Blue Hole in the world…..the current deepest known one was recently discovered in China…..at least it was discovered after the sign below was made…..

 

There were some free divers practicing for the upcoming competition. ¬†It was interesting to watch them prepare for the practice dives……

 

 

Kim’s Manatee friend….

 

 

The east side beach scenes……the east side beach in Long Island was the first place we found seaglass in any quantity and Kim immediately started making charms …….

 

 

An interesting formation of seagulls….commonly called “gully’s” here in the Bahamas…..

About two thirds of the way as you go up Long Island, there is a resort community that was founded in the 60’s called Stella Maris. ¬†The development was surveyed and subdivided but not much building ever occurred away from the main beach area. ¬†There are a lot of empty lots and some nice isolated hilltop houses in the area. ¬†They also have an interesting¬†salt water pool….why build a pool with all those complicated pumps and filters when you can just cut a channel through the rock to the ocean???? This was one of three pools in the development. ¬†If you own a house here you get resort privileges for about $300 a year.

 

 

One of our other stops during our tour was a second cave system called Hamilton Cave…..it is usually a guided tour but the guide was already inside with another group so we just wandered around the main entryway waiting…..we decided happy hour was fast approaching and decided not to wait for his return…..

The caves in the Bahamas are frequently more caverns than true caves as they are open in many places above. ¬†This is generally caused by erosion and tree roots working their way through the ceilings looking for water……some of these tree roots look like bundles of telephone poles…..

Bats ….!!!!

 

 

Another shot of Dean’s Blue Hole

 

The below photos are actually Shrimp Cave but somehow they wouldn’t stay in order as I was writing this post…..

 

Here’s a shot of Kim to round out this blog entry lounging on a stone formation on Long Island’s east beach……

Entertainment while afloat …..

Since there’s an upcoming period of unsettled weather headed our way, (prediction is 20-25 knot winds for three to five days) I thought this would be a good opportunity to talk about how we keep ourselves entertained while staying on the boat for extended periods. ¬†Sometimes that can be three or more days straight depending on where we are and how severe the weather might be. ¬†We like to anchor away from the crowds but that results in longer (and wetter) dinghy rides to and from shore.

 

We spend all but about two months a year on board, so keeping ourselves entertained can sometimes be a challenge.

I have reached a point where I am reading about a book per week. ¬†That can be challenging since maintaining an inventory of books in our limited space isn’t really a viable option. ¬†It does present a chance for us to resurrect our old “book club” of which Kim and I were the only members. ¬†It was very exclusive!

I discovered a series of books by F. Paul Wilson which mostly revolve around a character nicknamed “Repairman Jack”. ¬†These books are set mostly in late 1990’s NYC and Jack is a sort of a private investigator/fixer who becomes increasingly entrenched in unusual cases and circumstances that have a supernatural cause. ¬†Jack is sort of a Libertarian / polar opposite to a “Ray Donovan” type. ¬†The first book in that series is “Cold City”.

There are related story lines that make up a series of about six books called the “Adversary Cycle” which start with “The Keep” (set in 1941) which was also an 80’s movie of the same name, that butchered the story line. ¬†If you like fiction drama/mysteries with some supernatural twists, I highly recommend these books.

 

I also picked up a Jack Reacher book called The Killing Floor which turned out to be much better than the movies. ¬†I can’t imagine why they picked Tom Cruise to play the guy described in this book?? I also read a couple of Randy Wayne White’s “Doc Ford” books which are turning out to be good reads…..thanks for that tip Mike !!!!

I have found my Fire Tablet aka Kindle to be indispensable.  Now that we have on board wifi I can download books at will !!! We can also access Amazon videos and games on it !

Shop Amazon Devices- Fire Tablet Starting at $39.99

 

We didn’t have an opportunity to get a “Bahamas phone” until our second trip to George Town. ¬†That has made things much easier as these phones come with wifi hotspots. ¬†BTC (Bahamas Telephone Company) recently started offering unlimited data for $35 per month. ¬†Now we can watch online movies and tv shows through a variety of applications for free !!! Let me know if anyone wants the details of those and I can email them to you. ¬†(They work stateside too so you could theoretically eliminate your cable or satellite tv bill.) ¬†If you’re planning¬†to be in the Bahamas for an extended period be sure to pickup one of these phones…..you can get a Huawei brand smartphone (pronounced Wowee) for about $59 plus $16 for a SIM card on a prepaid plan. I found this link for an unlocked Huawei phone on Amazon which might work throughout the Caribbean if you get sim cards for each place you visit…..that also makes the blogging easier !!!!

We also love to play board games. ¬†But, space again is an issue….board games are out, so we have mostly dice games on board. ¬†We play a lot of Yahtzee, we were recently introduced to a new dice game called “Farkle”….and we have a set of dominoes on board if we want to play “Mexican Train”…..it’s a fun game that was taught to us by our dear friend Joan in Florida …..

thanks for the introduction to “Farkle” Doug and Barb on SV Melinda Kay !!!

 

Little Farmer’s Cay…..!!!!

As we made our way South through the Exuma chain of islands, we found what would become our favorite stop…..Little Farmer’s Cay. ¬†We spent a total of about six weeks here (between February and March) before and after a short George Town trip to get Mike to the Airport for his flight home to Tampa.

Satellite Image courtesy of Google Maps

Little Farmer’s is home to the Farmers Cay Yacht Club (FCYC) which is located on the Northeast tip of the Cay. ¬†The FCYC is owned and operated by two of the sweetest people we have ever had the pleasure to meet. ¬†Roosevelt (Roosie) and Shirley (Bo short for Bolene, her middle name) Nixon have run this Marina for about 27 years and Roosevelt just celebrated his 82nd birthday !!!! Their son Julian and his wife Daryll live just down the street from the yacht club also and are an amazing couple. Julian works for the electric company and Daryll runs a gift shop where she sells her handmade jewelry and is also the local agent for Flamingo Air.

 

 

Kim decided to hang her coffee mug, formerly my mom’s, up for this shot…..

The Nixons !!! “Roosie¬†and Bo”

 

My sister Jo and I in the cave on Great Guana Cay Northeast of Little Farmers.

 

Jo realizing her lifelong dream of petting a sea turtle…..

 

 

 

This is Kim and I with Earnestine Bain….wife of Terry Bain and co-owner of the Ocean Cabin Bar and restaurant. ¬†She is one sweet lady. ¬†There must be something in the water at Little Farmers that makes everyone so nice!!! ¬†She and her husband Terry (who took this photo and is pictured below at the party) have operated this establishment for over 25 years….Terry’s mother built the original bar. We attended their 25th wedding anniversary and Earnestine’s birthday party while we were at Little Farmers Cay…..it’s a great place and Terry makes a doozy of a drink named for the bar…..we came to know them as “the blue drinks that make Kim sleepy”

Terry and Merissa at the party….

 

A freshly speared Lionfish….which I gave to our new friend Dave on a catamaran named Fifth Quarter…..then moments later …..

Dave’s subsequent Lionfish sting……if you ever get tagged by a Lionfish submerge the injured area in the hottest water you can stand for as long as you can…..sorry Dave…glad it’s better

Catboat racing !!

 

 

Pre race preparations….

Sunset from the west side….

 

 

Rays in little harbour….

 

Cruiser’s dinner at FCYC….

Staniel…..home of the 007 Thunderball Grotto…and “Pig Beach” aka Big Majors

On our way South we stopped off for a few days near Staniel Cay which is also near where some scenes from the James Bond movie Thunderball was filmed. ¬†These were shot at the aptly named “Thunderball Grotto” ……We also hit Big Majors which is the Cay famous for the pigs who live on the island.

This is a shot of Kim which we made for a good friend’s son who needed photos for a project with words or phrases describing him. ¬† We thought it would be fun to add a pig….

Dinghy ride Piggy ??? Mike standing “guard” over the dinghy …..

So cute….

 

 

 

 

 

This was an odd one ….I’ve never seen a nurse shark with these kind of markings….

Warderick Wells….. part of the Exumas Land & Sea Park

Warderick Wells is part of the Exuma Land and Sea Park….they have a loop shaped Mooring field with about 20 Mooring Balls. ¬†We spent about six days here waiting for a front to blow through.

 

Image courtesy of Garmin BlueChart

The small black bars with the white dot are chart symbols for Mooring Balls…..

 

 

At the top of Boo Boo Hill is a pile of driftwood signs with boat names and dates. ¬†We found a piece of teak on our beach walk that I used to carve our boat name into….it took about six hours to carve and then I burned the letters to make them stand out….

 

Our sign placed on Boo Boo Hill….

 

 

The enormous pile of boat name signs on Boo Boo Hill….

 

 

As we placed the sign Kim pointed out that our boat sign sort of ended up (unintentionally) looking like a gun…..

The kissing rocks we found and copied….

A great resource for Radio repair

This is just a quick entry to say thank you to Jahnke Electronics in Green Bay, WI……just before we left Florida we had an issue with our Kenwood TS-50 HF transceiver. ¬†It was blowing the inline fuse when transmitting. ¬†Without that radio we can’t receive emails or weather reports when we are away from wifi and out of range of the NOAA weather reports broadcast by the Coast Guard on the VHF radio. ¬†We also use it to monitor maritime and weather voice networks.

 

The people at Jahnke checked out our radio, cleaned and aligned it, checked the capacitors, replaced the power button and replaced the memory battery, all for $100 !!! Plus it only took a few days !! It has been working great since then…..they weren’t able to replicate the fuse issue after they maintenanced it and replaced the on/off switch, but it works and that’s the most important thing for us.

Since we recently got our “HAM” licenses we look forward to many years of service from this radio…..thanks to Jahnke……

here’s a Link to their website …..

http://jahnkeelectronics.com/index.php

Bimini ….I was starting to call it Neverland

Because I thought we were never going to make it………

Kim, buying $2 conch…because you can’t get them that cheap counting your fuel and time if you go get them yourself !!!

 

 

She’s one shiny gal…..in the slip at Brown’s Marina, Bimini

 

The Beach on Bimini’s West side….

 

Kim and Mike looking for Atlantis….

 

Oops….

 

The entrance to the “Compleat Angler Bar” formerly Hemingway’s home in Bimini Oct 1995

 

Same spot 22.3 years later…..and 15 years after the bar burned down….